Cinnamon and Weight Loss

September 9, 2011

Healthy Diet

Cinnamon for weight loss? Does cinnamon really work by helping you lose weight.

Cinnamon figures among the most ancient spices in world. This small evergreen tree is cultivated inSri Lanka, Vietnam, Egypt, Brazil, Indonesia and India. It is prepared in two ways. It is prepared either by drying the cinnamon bark and rolling it into sticks (quills), or by crushing it into powder. Cinnamon’s peculiar taste and smell stems from cinnamaldehyde, a substance contained in the bark’s oil.

Cinnamon and Weight Loss

Cinnamon and Weight Loss

Cinnamon has one of the highest antioxidant levels of any spice, and many foods, too. You’ll get as many antioxidants in one teaspoon of cinnamon as a full cup of pomegranate juice or a half-cup of blueberries, two foods known for their antioxidant content.
Millions of people are searching for ways to help lose weight, and drinking cinnamon tea or eating cinnamon in other forms for weight loss can definitely help many shed pounds.

How does cinnamon cause weight loss

 

Cinnamon is a spice commonly used during festive winter times as it “warms” the body. This thermogenic response possibly speeds the body’s metabolism resulting in weight loss. Cinnamon actually creates heat within the body due to a chemical reaction. The body’s metabolism speeds up to counteract the excess heat and balance body temperature. Excess calories are burned throughout the process.

According to another theory, cinnamon decreases blood sugar levels, which increases the level of insulin. The higher amount of insulin is believed to shrink fat cells. Some experts believe cinnamon tea weight loss is especially effective for people with diabetes as they need more insulin. The fat cells in the abdomen are particularly sensitive to high insulin levels, and are very effective at storing energy – far more so that fat cells you’d find in other areas such as the lower body (i.e. hips, rear end, thighs). Because abdominal fat cells are so close to our digestive organs, and there is an extensive network of blood vessels circulating in the abdominal area, it’s even easier for fat cells to store excess glucose there.

Recommended Quantity Cinnamon 

 

Typical recommended dosages of ground cinnamon bark are 1 to 4 g daily. The German Commission E monograph suggests 1/2 to 3/4 teaspoon (2–4 grams) of the powder per day. A tea can be prepared from the powdered herb by boiling 1/2 teaspoon (2–3 grams) of the powder for ten to fifteen minutes, cooling, and then drinking.

Cinnamon oil is generally used at a dose of 0.05 to 0.2 g daily.

Cinnamon tea is also touted as a weight loss remedy when made with other ingredients. You may get better results with this recipe for Cinnamon and Honey Tea. Create a regular cinnamon tea and add 1 tablespoon of pure honey after the tea sits for half an hour so the boiling water does not destroy honey’s beneficial properties. It is recommended to drink all cinnamon teas both before bed and first thing in the morning.

Cinnamon flavor is due to an aromatic essential oil that makes up 0.5% to 1% of its composition. This oil is prepared by roughly pounding the bark, macerating it in seawater, and then quickly distilling the whole. It is of a golden-yellow color, with the characteristic odor of cinnamon and a very hot aromatic taste. The pungent taste and scent come from cinnamic aldehyde or cinnamaldehyde (about 60 % of the bark oil) and, by the absorption of oxygen as it ages, it darkens in color and develops resinous compounds. Other chemical components of the essential oil include ethyl cinnamate, eugenol (found mostly in the leaves), beta-caryophyllene, linalool, and methyl chavicol.

Pharmacological experiments suggest that the cinnamon-derived dietary factor cinnamic aldehyde (cinnamaldehyde) activates the Nrf2-dependent antioxidant response in human epithelial colon cells and may therefore represent an experimental chemopreventive dietary factor targeting colorectal carcinogenesis. Recent research documents anti-melanoma activity of cinnamic aldehyde observed in cell culture and a mouse model of human melanoma.

 

This web page is for information and support only and NOT a substitute for professional diagnosis and treatment! Nothing on this web page should be construed as medical advice. Please check with your own physician about any information that concerns you.
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